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Vesper Flights English writer and naturalist Helen MacDonald said her latest work, Vesper Flights, work is meant to resemble a cabinet of curiosities, or Wunderkammer Items in the cabinet natural and artificial are meant for people to handle and observe in a different way from our usual museums The essays inside are ones that have appeared in such publications as New York Times Magazine and New Statesmen In drawing these various pieces into one book, MacDonald s display does rejoice in the complexi English writer and naturalist Helen MacDonald said her latest work, Vesper Flights, work is meant to resemble a cabinet of curiosities, or Wunderkammer Items in the cabinet natural and artificial are meant for people to handle and observe in a different way from our usual museums The essays inside are ones that have appeared in such publications as New York Times Magazine and New Statesmen In drawing these various pieces into one book, MacDonald s display does rejoice in the complexity of things She shows readers that that not everything is about them in the natural world She wants readers to appreciate and love difference or otherness, and to see through other eyes beyond our human ones Exploring the grounds near her home, MacDonald said she was drawn to work as a naturalist She spent her childhood in Camberley, Surrey, in the United Kingdom, where she discovered nests, looked into ponds for the life teeming within, and became familiar with the many species of plants and animals that populated her sense of home Because this is an uncorrected proof, my attention wasn t immediately snagged as a reader I m so used to hard and fast starts and stops, so without those, I felt like I was on a scavenger hunt for the next new beginning The structure reminded of the stream of consciousness writings of James Joyce or Virginia Woolf A ha Maybe that s intentional More than likely though it s just in the final formatting stage In stream of consciousness, the writer s thoughts and reactions to events in life connect in one continuous flow It s not unlike the conversations I ve had with my closest friends and relatives The topic started in one area, connected to another topic that at first glance appeared dissimilar until the resemblance came into focus with the first In one essay, MacDonald talked about efforts made to help birds that migrate in places like New York City People built these massive behemoths in the sky that became a danger to the birds because of their attraction to the artificial lights The birds lost sight of their path, which would lead to their death People needed to intervene to rescue them in order for them to go back to their flight path MacDonald took this story and connected it with the dangers a Christian refugee faced as he made the perilous journey to the UK to flee persecution, only to fear he may have to return People also entered his flight path to free him from danger on his path to safety I found myself praying that he will not have to go back to a deadly path.My need for order took a backseat eventually to my love of good writing MacDonald s stories had a meditative quality I could easily envision the places she explored and the variety of wildlife she introduced, as if it was a collective memory we shared.Circling back to the title for her book, MacDonald described the flights of swifts their vesper flights Vespers are evening prayers The swifts ascended higher and higher until she could no longer see them I could see the swifts as a metaphor for how prayers ascend to God a beautiful image And though God isn t mentioned, I still saw His presence, almost like the book of Esther or Ruth in the Bible MacDonald s insights, her knowledge about the natural world, reinvigorated my sense of awe as I considered again God s created works We haven t even begun to plumb the depths of Earth or space I thought this when I read about her travel to parts of Chile with Nathalie Cabrol, an astrobiologist and a planetary geologist, who led an expedition to explore high altitudes in the desert and test methods for detecting life on Mars My need for order took a backseat to my love a well written, polished piece of expression MacDonald writes so well I found her stories to have a meditative quality I could easily envision the places she explored and the variety of wildlife she introduced to the reader, as if it was a collective memory we shared I love a great sentence and especially to finally put a word to something I ve seen or experienced myself The sight of birds swooping together in formation in what appears to be a choreographed dance to music only they hear is now known to me as a murmuration The word came from the essay that was previously published Dec 6, 2015 in the New York Times, The Human Flock The changing shape of starling flocks comes from each bird copying the motions of the six or seven others around it with extreme rapidity Their reaction time is less than a tenth of a second Turns can propagate through a cloud of birds at speeds approaching 90 miles per hour, making murmurations look from a distance like a single pulsing, living organism I look forward to seeing the finished work I really hope there are pictures It s not on .com yet, but I will update you when it s available In the meantime, I ve added the book she is most known for H is for Hawk to my reading list It s a memoir how training a young Northern Goshawk helped her cope with grief and depression at the sudden death in 2007 of her father, Alisdair MacDonald, a photojournalist She won the Samuel Johnson Prize and Costa Book Award in 2014, as well as others, for this memoir MacDonald is a fellow migraineur, but she noted this troubling neurological condition does have a bright spot She sees them as her muse She touched on something I just hadn t paired together In the postdrome stage, she said she finds her words flow as days seem newly forged and prone to surprising beauties location 750 Whoa I ve often thought I mcreative after a migraine attack I ve wondered if it s because the release I ve gotten after such crippling pain and illness makes me appreciate what I ve walked through and relaxed my mind allowing new ideas to take shape I must admit that it took me longer than usual to read this book It is a varied collection that rewards dipping into rather than being read cover to cover Some pieces are deeply personal accounts of Macdonald s childhood and others read almost as dispatches from the front line Two pieces that particularly resonated with me were Macdonalds account of watching eclipses and her piece on her migraines In the eclipse piece she brought back my own happy memories of the communal experience of watch I must admit that it took me longer than usual to read this book It is a varied collection that rewards dipping into rather than being read cover to cover Some pieces are deeply personal accounts of Macdonald s childhood and others read almost as dispatches from the front line Two pieces that particularly resonated with me were Macdonalds account of watching eclipses and her piece on her migraines In the eclipse piece she brought back my own happy memories of the communal experience of watching one of natures greatest shows Perhaps that is why the book works so well there is something in it for everyone, wheather you love nature writing, travel writing, memoir or environmental politics, there s something for everyone Some of the essays were very short and I found myself wanting to knowbut overall I enjoyed reading it and will probably return to it in future to dip a toe into Macdonald s lovely melancholy writing.I read a proof of this book on NetGalley Animals Don T Exist In Order To Teach Us Things, But That Is What They Have Always Done, And Most Of What They Teach Us Is What We Think We Know About Ourselves Helen Macdonald S Bestselling Debut H Is For Hawk Brought The Astonishing Story Of Her Relationship With Goshawk Mabel To Global Critical Acclaim And Announced Macdonald As One Of This Century S Most Important And Insightful Nature Writers H Is For Hawk Won The Samuel Johnson Prize For Nonfiction And The Costa Book Award, And Was A Finalist For The National Book Critics Circle Award And The Kirkus Prize For Nonfiction, Launching Poet And Falconer Macdonald As Our Preeminent Nature Essayist, With A Semi Regular Column In The New York Times MagazineIn Vesper Flights Helen Macdonald Brings Together A Collection Of Her Best Loved Essays, Along With New Pieces On Topics Ranging From Nostalgia For A Vanishing Countryside To The Tribulations Of Farming Ostriches To Her Own Private Vespers While Trying To Fall Asleep Meditating On Notions Of Captivity And Freedom, Immigration And Flight, Helen Invites Us Into Her Most Intimate Experiences Observing Songbirds From The Empire State Building As They Migrate Through The Tribute Of Light, Watching Tens Of Thousands Of Cranes In Hungary, Seeking The Last Golden Orioles In Suffolk S Poplar Forests She Writes With Heart Tugging Clarity About Wild Boar, Swifts, Mushroom Hunting, Migraines, The Strangeness Of Birds Nests, And The Unexpected Guidance And Comfort We Find When Watching Wildlife By One Of This Century S Most Important And Insightful Nature Writers, Vesper Flights Is A Captivating And Foundational Book About Observation, Fascination, Time, Memory, Love And Loss And How We Make Sense Of The World Around Us Vesper Flights by Helen Macdonald is very aptly titled The book of personal essays should be considered as the author s personal flights of memories and experiences I thoroughly enjoyed reading H is for Hawk and although Vesper Flights is a very different type of book, it is extremely interesting I wish the book had photographs of the places and the themes of the essays because it would be a perfect display or coffee table book The writing is filled with emotion and the careful thought of on Vesper Flights by Helen Macdonald is very aptly titled The book of personal essays should be considered as the author s personal flights of memories and experiences I thoroughly enjoyed reading H is for Hawk and although Vesper Flights is a very different type of book, it is extremely interesting I wish the book had photographs of the places and the themes of the essays because it would be a perfect display or coffee table book The writing is filled with emotion and the careful thought of one who is serious about nature, birding, and how our environment changes the lives, habitation, and migration patterns of birds There are so many pages I read which had me wanting to get outside and look again to the skies and woodland areas trying to spot birds in flight I felt it was so appropriate as I read of the author watching the night sky with Andrew Farnsworth of the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology during a migratory season I am reading this during May 2020 migratory week and following the live migration map on BirdCast Publication Date August 25, 2020Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for the opportunity to read and review this book On warm summer evenings swifts that aren t sitting on eggs or tending their chicks fly low and fast, screaming in speeding packs around rooftops and spires Later, they gather higher in the sky, their calls now so attenuated by air and distance that to the ear they corrode into something that seems less than sound, to suspicions of dust and glass And then, all at once, as if summoned by a call or bell, they rise higher and higher until they disappear from view These ascents are called vespersOn warm summer evenings swifts that aren t sitting on eggs or tending their chicks fly low and fast, screaming in speeding packs around rooftops and spires Later, they gather higher in the sky, their calls now so attenuated by air and distance that to the ear they corrode into something that seems less than sound, to suspicions of dust and glass And then, all at once, as if summoned by a call or bell, they rise higher and higher until they disappear from view These ascents are called vespers flights, or vesper flights, after the Latin vesperfor evening Vespers are evening devotional prayers, the last and most solemn of the day, and I have always thought vesper flights the most beautiful phrase, an ever falling blue For years I ve tried to see them do it But always the dark got too deep, or the birds skated too wide and far across the sky for me to follow.Written as assignments or for friends, for the joy of exploring a subject, for piecing together a story or investigating something that troubled or fascinated , the forty some essays in Vesper Flights cover an array of naturalist topics very often autobiographical, very often political in the beautifully lyrical writing style of Helen Macdonald that would be instantly recognisable to fans of her acclaimed memoir, H is for Hawk I was fascinated by the range of scientific topics here and inspired by Macdonald s travels not only through space, from experiencing the top of the Empire State Building with an Ornithologist to camping in Chile s Atacama Desert with an Astrobiologist, but also sharing Macdonald s travels through her own interior landscapes and it all solidly underpins her ultimate quest for finding ways to recognise and love difference The attempt to see through eyes that are not your own To understand that your way of looking at the world is not the only one To think what it might mean to love those that are not like you To rejoice in the complexity of things Helen Macdonald has lived a rich and curiosity filled life, and being a poet, a naturalist, and a historian, she has the factual knowledge and literary skills to make persuasive art out of her experiences Exquisitely suited to my own tastes and interest Note I read an ARC from NetGalley and passages quoted may not be in their final forms I know it s unfair for me to excerpt so extensively here, but passages are preserved for my own future recollection of what inspired me, and are not to be considered authoritative Mea m xima culpa When I was a child I d assumed animals were just like me Later I thought I could escape myself by pretending I was an animal Both were founded on the same mistake For the deepest lessons animals have taught me is how easily and unconsciously we see other lives as mirrors of our own. As an odd and solitary child with an early and all consuming compulsion to seek out wild creatures , Helen Macdonald felt privileged to grow up on an estate complete with woods and meadow, teeming with wildlife for her to observe, engage with, and explore This compulsion seems to have never left her and these essays cover a huge range of the places and species, mostly birds, that Macdonald has sought out around the world It would be impossible to offer a summary of everything these pages contain, so what follows are just some of the bits that I found personally engaging in Macdonald s philosophy And one of the main threads of that philosophy seems to be that we humans are blind to the diversity of life around us and that which we don t see, we don t concern ourselves with We find ourselves fascinated by raptors and especially in urban landscapes Falcons haunt landscapes that speak to us of mortality mountains, by virtue of their eternity industrial ruins, by virtue of their reminding us that this, too, in time will be gone, and that we should protect what is here and now. But something like the fungal networks underpinning forests some of the oldest and largest organisms in the world are all but invisible to us We are visual creatures To us, forests are places made of trees and leaves and soil But all around me now, invisible and ubiquitous, is a network of fungal life, millions of tiny threads growing and stretching among trees, clustering around piles of rabbit droppings, stitching together bush and path, dead leaves and living roots We hardly know it is there until we see the fruiting bodies it throws up when conditions are right But without fungi s ceaseless cycling of water, nutrients and minerals, the forest wouldn t work the way it does, and perhaps the greatest mystery of mushrooms for me is in how they are visible manifestations of an essential yet unregarded world. I was particularly intrigued by Macdonald s trip to the top of the Empire State Building for night bird watching a glimpse at an annual teeming swirl of life going on mostly unobserved, far above human notice As she notes, insects travel above us in extraordinary numbers half a billion a month over a square mile of English farmland making up nearly three tons of biomass a number estimated to be higher over New York City as a gateway to a continent , and in the wide open air over Manhattan s skyscrapers, it is said, Once you get above six hundred and fifty feet, you re lofted into a realm where the distinction between city and countryside has little or no meaning at all During the day, chimney swifts feast on these vast drifts of life during the night, so do the city s resident and migratory bats, and nighthawks with white flagged wings On days with north west winds in late summer and early fall, birds, bats and migrant dragonflies all feed on rich concentrations of insects caused by powerful downdraughts and eddies around the city s high rise buildings, just as fish swarm to feed where currents congregate plankton in the ocean. Whether writing about how she lives in denial of the symptoms of oncoming, crippling migraines which Macdonald then extrapolates to explain how humanity can live in denial of the biggest threats to our collective existence , or writing about viewing a solar eclipse and feeling an overwhelming sense of community, Macdonald makes many surprising connections here And as I opened with, many of them are political connections Conservatism and Swan Upping, deer as jingoistic symbolism, waiting for a thunderstorm like waiting for the next Brexit or Trump, Waiting for hope, stranded in that strange light that stills our hearts before the storm of history A few examples that gave me pause, as in the morality of tagging and tracking migratory animals In our age of drone warfare, it is hard not to see each animal being tracked across the map as symbolically extending the virtues of technological dominance and global surveillance. Or watching a gathering of migratory Eurasian cranes in northeastern Hungary and contemplating the razorwire on that country s southern border, meant to keep out Syrian refugees Watching the flock has brought home to me how easy it is to react to the idea of masses of refugees with the same visceral apprehension with which we greet a cloud of moving starlings or tumbling geese, to view it as a singular entity, strange and uncontrollable and chaotic But the crowds coming over the border are people just like us Perhaps too much like us We do not want to imagine what it would be like to have our familiar places reduced to ruins In the face of fear, we are all starlings, a group, a flock, made of a million souls seeking safety. Or the flaw in thinking that a species is native just because it s familiar The history of hawfinches in Britain reminds us how seamlessly we confuse natural and national history, how readily we assume nativity in things that are familiar to us, and how lamentably easy it is to forget how we are all from somewhere else. Several times Macdonald returns to the idea of people conflating natural and national history and it made me wonder if it reflects a new idea a pushback against globalisation and freer borders by those who idealise a return to some purer past but she also shares older stories, like the farmers during WWII who attacked migratory birds that gleaned their fieldsNo protection for the Skylark ran the headlines in the local press Skylarks that sing to Nazis will get no mercy hereShe writes about the glamour she assigned to Bewick s swans when she was a child because they migrated from the Soviet Union, crossing the Iron Curtain with absolute unconcern And she tells the fascinating story of a book she loved as a child and foundinsidious when she revisited it as an adult A Cuckoo in the House by Maxwell Knight a former MI5 intelligence officer known as M yes, he was the inspiration for the James Bond character was a popular book about the bird famously known for its nestly subterfuges, and Knight not only hid within its pages the vocabulary of his secret world of agents, runners, and handlers, but its release somehow transformed Knight into an avuncular naturalist who began a second career on BBC radio, encouraging children to observe, explore, and report on their environments, in a way that incidentally was training the country s next generation of spies and spooks I suppose this conflation of the natural with the national has always been with us.If there is a common theme here, I suppose it s a call to beaware of both the hidden ecosystems around us and the hidden biases we harbour and through this awareness, to spreadof that notion of love that Macdonald opens with to see with the eyes of others and rejoice in the complexity of things Thoroughly worthwhile read, beginning to end I loved Helen Macdonald s H is for Hawk so I was excited to see she had a new book, and happy to say that Vesper Flights is another great read This collection of essays, some previously published but all new to me, covers all sorts of topics, from mushrooms to migraines and swans to skyscrapers, all written in Macdonald s gorgeous prose Take, for example, her description of a nature walk in England s Wicken Fen As we crossed one of the fen s ancient waterways, a barn owl floated past us, I loved Helen Macdonald s H is for Hawk so I was excited to see she had a new book, and happy to say that Vesper Flights is another great read This collection of essays, some previously published but all new to me, covers all sorts of topics, from mushrooms to migraines and swans to skyscrapers, all written in Macdonald s gorgeous prose Take, for example, her description of a nature walk in England s Wicken Fen As we crossed one of the fen s ancient waterways, a barn owl floated past us, mothy wings shining through particulate mist at our feet a drinker moth caterpillar inched furrily across the path like a cautiously mobile moustache Or this passage The deer drift in and out of the trees like breathing They appear, unexpectedly delicate and cold, as if chill air is pouring from them to the ground to pool into the mist that half obscures their legs and turning flanks Or her description of that hot week in Gloucestershire in the 1990s when thunderstorms came every evening so the air turned sepia at six and before the first drops of storm rain sent pollen dust up in puffs from the skylight I d open the windows and wait for thunder while little owls called through the thick air, and in the morning tiny white dots of storm blown blossom covered the house with wet French lace The beauty of these passages is palpable, yet so too is the problem of climate change, which hangs over this collection like that coming storm she calls it the storm as expectation As solution about to be offered Or all hell about to break loose I can t help but think that this is the weather we are all now made of All of us waiting Waiting for news Waiting for hope, stranded in that strange light that stills our hearts before the storm of history Reading Vesper Flights at the beginning of March 2020 was, for me, like being stranded in that strange light a beautiful place to have spent time in before the storm that these essays foreshadow hit.Many thanks to NetGalley and Grove Press for providing me with an ARC of this title in exchange for my honest review Recommended This is a beautifully written book of essays about nature and birds It is a book to be savored in increments and so I am hesitant to give it a rating My ARC is making it impossible for me to do that The table of contents lists the name of each essay and the page number but the book is not formatted into individual essays and has only paragraph breaks between each one There is no flow, no time for me to appreciate what I just read before I go on to the next I have found myself partly into th This is a beautifully written book of essays about nature and birds It is a book to be savored in increments and so I am hesitant to give it a rating My ARC is making it impossible for me to do that The table of contents lists the name of each essay and the page number but the book is not formatted into individual essays and has only paragraph breaks between each one There is no flow, no time for me to appreciate what I just read before I go on to the next I have found myself partly into the next essay still trying to figure out what happened to the nests she was just writing about In all fairness to the author my issues have nothing to do with the writing and everything to do with the formatting.Thank you to Netgalley for giving me the opportunity to read and give a review Reading Helen Macdonald s 2014 book H is for Hawk was highly memorable for me As I wrote in my review, this is a book which makes one look afresh at man s links with nature In a time when we are rightly focused on global, big picture problems, it nevertheless reminds us of the values we derive from being individually and inextricably bound to our own heritage and community.Macdonald s latest work, Vesper Flights continues on the same theme, this time expanding on the glory and importance of Reading Helen Macdonald s 2014 book H is for Hawk was highly memorable for me As I wrote in my review, this is a book which makes one look afresh at man s links with nature In a time when we are rightly focused on global, big picture problems, it nevertheless reminds us of the values we derive from being individually and inextricably bound to our own heritage and community.Macdonald s latest work, Vesper Flights continues on the same theme, this time expanding on the glory and importance of our differences in a collection of vivid and powerful essays I hope that this book works a little like a Wunderkammer a cabinet of curiosities It is full of strange things and it is concerned with the quality of wonder..Most of all I hope my work is about a thing that seems to me of the deepest possible importance in our present day historical moment finding ways to recognise and love difference The attempt to see through eyes that are not your own To understand that your way of looking at the world is not the only one To think what it might mean to love those that are not like you To rejoice in the complexity of things Macdonald certainly has a remarkable and varied life Even so, it was surprising how often I found myself relating to her stories Sure, I am never likely to watch nocturnal bird migration from the top of the Empire State Building, nor am I likely to ascend to some of South America s highest peaks to learn about research into life on Mars, fascinating though it was to read about these and other adventures But I could totally relate to her thoughts on migraine, for example and when the pain comes it is one sided, sometimes on the left of your skull and sometimes on the right, although it is so intense it can t be kept in either place, and it ripples like a flag cracking in strong wind, or thrums deep like a heartbeat, and sometimes one of your eyes waters, the one on the same side as the pain More cheerfully, I read several times over her description of how it feels to be in the presence of a bird s nest One house we lived in had a lovely courtyard garden which was regularly home to various pairs of nesting birds It was so lovely to be reminded of just how magical it is to be able quietly to peer in to a nest first to see the eggs, and later to see the chicks I always felt a bit guilty about doing so because I did not want to disturb the birds, and yet I could not stop myself either Macdonald writes beautifully about this dilemma Though I never searched for nests, I d find them all the same I d be sitting at the kitchen window eating a bowl of Weetabix and I d spot a dunnock flit into the forsythia, a mouse sized bird, all streaks and spots and whispers I knew I should look away, but I d hold my breath at my transgression and track the almost imperceptible movement of leaves as the disappeared bird hopped up and across through twigs to its nest Then I d see the blur of wings as the bird slipped free of the hedge and was gone And once I d determined where it was, and saw that the adults were gone, I needed to know.Many of Macdonald s essays look, from one perspective or another, at climate change, and the whole host of problems facing our planet as a result of human action and intervention Covid 19 was a distant unknown when she was writing this book, but she foreshadows what happened when it arrived with amazing prescience Our eschatological traditions tend to envision the apocalypse as happening very fast, with the dawning of one final, single, dreadful day But the systems of the wider world do not operate according to the temporalities of our human lives we are already inside the apocalypse, and forest fires and category five hurricanes are as much signs of it as the rising of the beast from the pit.Apocalyptic thinking is a powerful antagonist to action It makes us give up agency, feel that all we can do is suffer and wait for the end That is not what we must be thinking now For an apocalypse is not always a cataclysmic ending, and not always a disaster In its earlier senses the word meant a revelation, a vision, an insight, an unveiling of things previously unknown, and I pray that the revelation our current apocalypse can bring is the knowledge that we have the power to intervene Although some predicted the apocalyptic esque arrival of the Coronavirus, the vast majority of us had no idea that it was a possibility Nevertheless, our response to the pandemic illustrates Macdonald s point precisely With a fast moving situation, we acted fast Rapid decisions were made about what to do, even though that action was hugely difficult and challenging Climate change, on the other hand, with its slow, insidious, future focused nature is much harder for us as individuals to grasp and take action to stop It has been so powerful to see how quickly nature has started to recover during these lockdown weeks I really hope that we humans can learn something from this to help us change in ways that probably would never have seemed possible otherwise.Once again, Macdonald has given us that perfect book hugely readable, yet endlessly thought provoking And she completely fulfils her self imposed brief This is indeed a cabinet of curiosities which certainly inspires wonder and illuminates complexity And it goes further still, with page after page of beauty, emotion, insight and challenge I am already looking forward to re reading it For the deepest lesson animals have taught me is how easily and unconsciously we see other lives as mirrors of our own..Animals don t exist in order to teach us things, but that is what they have always done, and most of what they teach us is what we think we know about ourselves We use animals as ideas to amplify and enlarge aspects of ourselves, turning them into simply, safe harbours for things we feel and often cannot express Grateful thanks to Grove Press for a review copy via NetGalley With H is for Hawk, Helen Macdonald wrote a showstopper that was at the top of many lists Vesper Flights, beginning with its beautiful title, is composed of numerous essays, and at least in the prepublication galley I had, they are all strung together, no breaks Until I understood this odd presentation, I had to put on the brakes and reread several beginnings to regather the context But the material itself is mesmerizing Whether she is talking about migratory habits and going to the top of With H is for Hawk, Helen Macdonald wrote a showstopper that was at the top of many lists Vesper Flights, beginning with its beautiful title, is composed of numerous essays, and at least in the prepublication galley I had, they are all strung together, no breaks Until I understood this odd presentation, I had to put on the brakes and reread several beginnings to regather the context But the material itself is mesmerizing Whether she is talking about migratory habits and going to the top of the Empire State Building for a nature hike, or describing her own migraines, she does so with grace, power, poetry and blazing intellect If you are a lover of birdswell, of anything and everything in the natural worldyou might feel you could have written this collection of essays yourself Each piece is a delicate vignette of minute, sensitive discoveries in the natural world I so admire Helen MacDonald for her heartfelt appreciation of all the things in nature that pull at my own heart I nominate her Nature Writer Queen.


About the Author: Helen Macdonald

Helen Macdonald is a writer, poet, historian, illustrator and naturalist She s worked as a Research Fellow at Jesus College, Cambridge, as a professional falconer, and in raptor research and conservation projects across Eurasia She is an affiliate of the Department of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge She lives in Suffolk, UK.


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